A-m (umopapisdn) wrote,
A-m
umopapisdn

I thought I'd lost this! heh heh. I was taking a seminar on writing short stories for children. The facilitator asked us to take an event from our week and incorporate it into the story. At the time I was living in Shelburne, ON and the weekend I sat down to write just happened to be the Annual Fiddle Contest.

Here's what the story I created:

I'm Staying Right Here!

Abby Fiddle was seven years old. She like being seven. It was old enough to do some things by herself, but still young enough for her Daddy and Mommy to tuck her in at night.

Abby lived in the big city. She loved it. Her house was a townhouse in a special complex. She could go to the playground all by herself. And, just before the street lights came on at night, she and her friends could play hide and seek among the backyard fences.

But the best thing about living in the city was being right next door to the mall. Abby loved outings to the mall. There were hundreds of stores for all different kinds of things. There were book stores, clothing stores, food stores, and best of all there were toy stores. Sometimes Abby's Dad let her look around for hours.

Abby thought that the city was just about the best place in the world to live. That's why she was so surprised when her Daddy told her they were moving.

"Where are we going?" Abby asked.

"To a little town called Shelburne," said her Dad.

"Will my friends come too?"

"No," said Abby's Dad.

"Will there be a big mall?"

"No," said Abby's Dad.

"Well then I'm staying right here!" said Abby.

But the first weekend in August Abby's family packed up and loaded into a big truck. "Wave goodbye to our old house," Abby's mom said.

"No," said Abby.

Abby sat near the window and watched the city disappear behind them. Soon fields of corn and pastures with cows lined both sides of the road. "Why not count how many cow's we pass?" Abby's Mom asked.

"No," said Abby.

Finally, after what seemed like hours, the truck drove into a little town, turned down a street and pulled into the driveway of a red brick house.

"Would you like to come in and see your new room?" asked Abby's Mom.

"Does it have blue walls like my room in the city?" asked Abby.

"No," said her Mom.

"Well then I'm staying right here!"

"Why don't you go across the street to the playground?" asked Abby's Dad.

"Does it have a twirly yellow slide like the one in the city?" asked Abby.

"No," said her Dad.

"Well then I'm staying right here!" said Abby.

Abby's Mom and Dad left her and went to unpack the truck. "If I don't ever go out," thought Abby, "We'll have to move back to the city for sure!"

Suddenly Abby heard a strange noise. It sounded like a drum. Abby unrolled the window just a little bit. Abby could hear strange music. It sounded just like a marching band. Abby rolled the window down all the way and peaked her head out of the truck. There were people standing all over their front yards. Some people were sitting in lawn chairs next to the road.

The sound of the marching band got louder and louder. All of a sudden two men came around the corner carrying a huge banner. Abby jumped out of the truck and ran to the curb. She sounded out the words on the banner. "Fid-dle-ville Par-ade," she read. "Wow," thought Abby, "A parade just for me!"

Abby sat down in the green grass and watched the procession pass by. There was the marching band, some dancing clowns, huge floats with people dressed up in all sorts of wonderful costumes, and some men in funny hats driving little tiny cars around in circles. Real horses with cowgirls trotted by. Some people were throwing candies, and a big gorilla came over and handed Abby a bright red balloon. As she opened up a lollypop, Abby thought to herself "A small town really is the best place in the world to live." Then she ran inside to see what colour her new room would be.
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